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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 365 (some duplicates have been removed)
leave veitch author of "this town" is with us. it's a brilliant expose of how washington d.c. turns out to be exactly as awful as everyone thinks it is. but we start tonight in russia. with edward snowden, the former n.s.a. contractor turned whistle blower and also of the upcoming lonely planet terminal-d of the moscow airport. so what has he been up to apart from nothing? >> russian news agencies reported that snowden would get a special i.d. card or document of some kind that would allow him to finally leave the airport transit zone. but it turns out that the lawyer wasn't carrying any such i.d. card. he did have some fresh clothes for us, some pizza and a couple of books by check often. >> john: that's nice because nothing lightens a man's spirits like theodore. i think you'll find him in barnes and enable's misery section. take that. now you understand suffering. i've got no problem with you, checkov. no problem. but like a hotel phone ringing at 5:30 a.m. because you specifically requested it, snowden has provided a real wake-up call. (laughing). he's forced americans to examine th
company" -- 50 years after the historic march on washington, we go back to the scene with john lewis, who spoke that day half a century ago. where you're standing now, looking out there. that's all the crowd. >> it was good to be in the presence of lincoln. and i feel honored to have an opportunity to come here almost 50 years later. >> announcer: funding is provided by -- carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org. anne gumowitz. the betsy and
by side with james compilingelping him. and arranging his papers. >> she moved back to washington d.c. in her elder years and became very much behind the scenes in a political field again. >> as henry clay famously said, everybody loves mrs. madison. her equally famous response "that's because mrs. madison loves everybody." >> dolley madison came to her service as first lady with experience during thomas jefferson's two terms. the president often called on her to assist him. this sense of the usefulness of diplomacy allowed dolley to hit the ground wanting when she assumed the role in 1809 as her husband james madison became andpresident.good evening welcome. tonight we will learn about the intriguing dolley madison. we have two guests at our table. let me introduce you to them. catherine allgor, an author and biographer of dolley madison. and a historian. one of her books is called "a perfect union." thank you for being here. edith mayo was the creator of the first lady's exhibit at the smithsonian. so many smithsonian visitors have seen this throughout the years. thank you for bei
georgia. recently, he and i returned to the national mall in washington to remember that day in 1963 and the march that changed america. >> people were all the way down. and you just saw hundreds and thousands of individuals. i'm john lewis, and i was the youngest speaker. ten of us spoke. i spoke number six. dr. king spoke number ten. and out of the ten people that spoke that day, i'm the only one still around. >> congratulations. >> what's that? >> congratulations. >> thank you very much. >> it was a great moment in american life. >> you were his friend? >> yeah. i got to know dr. king. i met him in 1958 when i was 18. but i first heard of him when i was 15 years old in the 10th grade. we worked together. we marched together. we got arrested together in selma, alabama. >> have you ever heard this story before? >> yes, i have. >> you have? >> i watched it on tv. >> you did? >> so you know about the sit-ins? the freedom ride? >> yeah. >> people marching for the right to vote? you know, i was on the march from selma to montgomery. i was beaten. on march 7th, 1965, a group of us, about
. definitionging the of cancelable reduce unnecessary treatments. washington journal is live tomorrow. will be back here with the c- span townhall tomorrow looking at immigration and the economy live at 7:00 eastern. thank you for joining us this evening. session two of first ladies and ladies, influence image begins. all this month we are showing encore presentations of season one. programs on every first lady from martha washington to ida mckinley. tonight, it is doubly medicine. -- dolly madison. >> dolley was socially adept and politically savvy. >> she was his best friend. she compensated. >> james madison wishes to meet her. >> she carved out a space for women where they can wield a great deal of political power. >> dolley madison would sit at the head of the table and erect the conversation. >> she got these people to the white house and entertained them. got them together and got them talking. >> this was important to her to make everyone feel welcome. >> it was considered her classic look. people noticed it. >> it was a perfect setting for james and dolley madison >> she sat side by side w
at the "washington post." and no one knows what's in store next. jeff bezos pays $250 million and takes over the news operation that took down a president. but can the guy who gave us the kindle give the news business a much-needed boost? >>> a new sports network is here, fox sports 1, with live sports like major league baseball. >> unbelievable! >> college football. ufc, college basketball, nascar and more. >> yes, espn has a new arch rival, thanks to rupert murdoch. we'll talk to the head of espn about how he plans to keep fox from scoring. >>> jon stewart still not here in a huge deal. he's actually being taken over by amazon ceo jeff bezos. >> and it's the biggest battle for late-night since leno and letterman or leno and conan. maybe jimmy and jimmy. now it's jon versus john. just a few weeks left in jon stewart's summer hiatus. i wonder if john oliver will find it difficult to hand back "the daily show." i'm brian stelter, and this is "reliable sources." >>> welcome to washington. what a head-spinning week it's been to the reporters in this town. for 80 years "the washington post" was synonymou
? we'll have analysis from raj rajaratnam of the "washington post." eric schmitt of the "new york times." and cbs news state department correspondent margaret brennan. and we'll look at another story that rocked washington, the sale of the "washington post". we'll talk about the future of newspapers with former "washington post" editor len downie. former "new york times" editor bill keller. and john harris, editor in chief of politico. there's a lot to cover, but this is "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> schieffer: and good morning again, michael hayden who served as both the c.i.a. and n.s.a. director now consulted for the cherdov group here in washington, joins us as our lead guest this morning. general, the president made that news conference on friday, and he said the american people need to know more about what the national security agency is doing because there are a growing number of people in the congress who are wondering is the n.s.a. infringing on americans' right to privacy? what do you think-
approaches this situation is a top priority. "the washington post" published something online that u.s.,s details about the that the budget has grown enormously since 9/11, that the cia is far bigger than outside experts had estimated, that the u.s. is involved in new cyber programs to attack other programs in countries. this information has never been released despite efforts from outside folks. does the president believe this is helpful now and the current climate to have discussion about the details about how the u.s. is spending its money in these departments to get a better understanding, as he said, make the public comfortable with how this money is being spayed and what type of programs are being used? -- that storyhed was published since i walked out here. i'm not in a position to comment on a specific story. the president believes that strengthening public confidence in these programs is important to the success of these programs. there is little debate about the fact these programs are critical to our national security, that they have made a role in protecting the homeland
to make the first march on washington and i never really got over that until president obama said please lead us in the invocation, and that was in january of this year. thank you reverend sharpton and others for asking me to lend a few words to this most precious gatheri gathering as i look out at the crowd, i find myself saying, what are we doing today? where have we come from? what has been accomplished and where do we go from this point forwa forward? i think of one theme that has been played over and over in the past few months and it's one that bring great controversy. stand your ground. and we can think of standing your ground in the negative, but i ask you today to flip that coin and make stand your ground a positive ring for all of us who believe in freedom and justice and equality, that we stand firm on the ground that we have already made and be sure that nothing is taken away from us because there are efforts to turn back the clock of freedom. and i ask you today will you allow that to happen? take the words "stand your ground" in a positive sense. stand your ground in terms
on anniversary of the march on washington, and the legacy of martin luther king jr.. series, first ladies, influence and image. over the next couple of hours, we will visit places with history curators. away fighting the revolutionary war, martha washington ran their plantation. >> it is clear that martha arrived at mount vernon in 1859 and there was a lot of management that she had to do. when she married george washington, she brings with her to mount vernon 12 housemates. that is really almost unimaginable luxury. these are slaves that are for the most part, not field labor, not producing crops, which is where your income is coming from. they are doing things like cooking, serving at table, clean the house, doing the laundry, doing selling, this is not productive labor in the sense that it is not productive income. she brings them with her and she brings financial resources to the marriage as well as her managerial skills. it makes mount vernon a successful operation and it makes it possible for washington to be away for eight years fighting a war. the fact that he has this support sys
-perry. live this morning from washington, d.c. where thousands of people turned out to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the march on washington for jobs and freedom yesterday. only one man who spoke from the steps of the lincoln memorial five decades ago remains alive today, congressman john lewis, and he spoke forcefully. >> i got arrested 40 times during the '60s, beaten, left bloody and unconscious. but i'm not tired, i'm not weary. i'm not prepared to sit down and give up. i am ready to fight and continue the fight, and you must fight. >> although the architect of the march has passed away, many of the inequities that prompted the struggle remain firmly in place. in 1963 the march called for equal access to jobs, fair wages, unfettered voting rights and intraracial segregation, access to decent health care, schools, housing. half a century later the struggle continues. the struggle continues for decent work and humane conditions that pays a living wage of the nationwide unemployment rate is 7.4%. for african-americans it's 12.6%. for young african-american men between 20 and 24 the u
be the secretary of dhs is the most thankless job in washington. that is not true. no doubt, it is a very big and comics job. it is literally a 24/7 job, that as my successor will soon learn, it is also one of the most rewarding jobs there is. what you do hear matters to the lives of people all across our great nation him and your decisions affect them in direct and tangible ways. you make sure their families are safe from terrorist threats, that their local first responders have equipment and training and funding, and that when disaster strikes people who have lost everything are given food and shelter and hope. and that thanks for that is not owed any single individual or cabinet secretary, but to that 240,000 dhs employees, many of whom work in tough conditions around the clock to accomplish our shared and noble mission, and that includes some who have made the ultimate sacrifice for our country. they are the backbone of your nation's homeland security, and over the past 4 1/2 years, it has been my pleasure to serve with them and build a more agile department of homeland security. i thank
. but increasingly that free press has had quite a high price tag. >> the "washington post," the city's legendary yet struggling newspaper sold to one of the country's wealthiest men, amazon.com chairman jeff bezos. >> the "washington post" is is now owned by the head of amazon and its 14 print subscribers are already noticing one difference because the paper now comes in ludicrously wasteful packaging. but i will say they've made it much easier to return the news if you don't like it. still, this acquisition raises some big questions. first, how do you pronounce that guy's name? (pronouncing it differently n) i don't know. secondly, are you sure that this is a good investment? >> for 0 years the "washington post" has been owned by the grand family earning a reputation for top investigative journalism. but like most papers, it struggled over the past ten years. >> its circulation is half what it was in '93. >> it lost more than $50 million last year. >> john: oh, my god. i think i get it. this is just bezos' car wash. it's a front for a massive meth operation. say his name it's he euvment senbezos. s
at the 1963 march on washington for jobs on freedom. "he has got the whole world in his hands. >> let us listen please to the words of this song and understand that in the heart of our creator, every soul has the same value and should be valued equally. thank you very much for the opportunity to sing for you. ♪ he's got the whole world in his hands. he's got the whole wide world in his hands. he's got the whole world in his hands. he's got the whole world in his hands. [singing "he's got the whole ♪orld in his hands"] ♪ [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the speaker of the united states house of representatives, the honorable john boehner. >> how about a round of applause? [applause] let me thank my colleagues for their testimonials and express my gratitude to all the members of staff of the congressional black caucus in their assistance planning this ceremony. we have many guests. the mayor is here. our attorney general is here. we want to welcome all of you. right now, i have the distinct honor of introducing a great patriot, the recipient of the presidential medal of freedom, a
to their center-right readers. and we'll see if jeff bezos can change that with his new "washington post." another week, another so-called major speech from president obama. he says he's ending fannie mae and freddie mac. but i see at least one if not two new government insurance plans. is anything really changing here besides rhetoric? and as the time warner/cbs blackout continues here's the big question. will this speed up the demise of the cable tv model? more and more americans are looking into cutting that cord. all those stories and much more coming up in "the kudlow report," beginning right now. >>> good evening, everyone. i'm larry kudlow. this is "the kudlow report." first up tonight, a major shake-up at two of the country's most influential newspapers. after four generations of family ownership the "washington post" is selling to amazon ceo jeff bezos. this coming on the heels of the "new york times" fire sale of the "boston globe," unloading the paper to red sox owner john henry for seven cents on the dollar. so what do the "washington post," "the new york times," "the boston globe," an
morning, august 15. ahead on the "washington journal ," your reaction to the latest development in egypt and what the u.s. response should be. you should join the conversation at (202) 585-3880, our line for republicans. (202) 585-3881 for democrats. we also have our line for independents at (202) 585-3882. join us on facebook, send us a tweet, or e-mail address, journal@c-span.org. at somegin with a look of the headlines from outside the u.s., the "guardian" newspaper -- egypt's bloody crackdown. when the story first went to prince, the death toll was 200 78. overnight, the death toll has been updated to 421. there is this from the "miami killed asundreds egypt's forces storm the protest camps. a similar headline from "usa today," egypt the reps in chaos. -- a reps and chaos. from the "wall street journal" website -- egypt's military regime a reps setting off a day of violence that left at least 421 people dead. the government fractured and ties with its international partners in tatters. cairo streets were calm this morning following the curfew overnight with funerals for the dead. fur
. ♪ [applause] >> thank you. 50 years ago, they did not take a bus outing to come to washington. there will be those that will miscast this as some great social event. but let us remember 50 years ago some came to washington having rode the back of buses. some came to washington that couldn't stop and buy a cup of coffee until they got across the mason dixon line. some came to washington sleeping in their cars because they couldn't rent a motel room. some came to washington never having had the privilege to vote. some came having seen their friends shed blood. but they came to washington so we could come today in a different time and a different place and we owe them for what we have today. [applause] i met a man not long ago, i tell it often, he says i'm african american but i don't understand all this civil rights marching you're talking about, reverend al. i've accomplished, i've achieved. look at my resume. i went to the best schools. i'm a member of the right clubs. i had the right people read my resume. civil rights didn't write my resume. i looked at his resume. i said, y
of dictator throwing thunder bolts out of the sky in washington. he's not. this is a federal system and that means the states are involved. and that's as it should be. and i think more power to him -- or more kudos to had him for wanting to do it that way. some states are participating in the health care markets. some are not. the feds will do it if the states don't. on immigration, there's a role for the states and i think it is going to be an ecpabded role for the states in any kind of reform. on health care, the interesting thing to me is that the business -- a lot of the business community wants obama care to go through. by business community, i mean hospitals, insurers, health care networks, they want more customers. so they went to this republican red state governor and said, you know what? this is pro business. be for it. and she was. >> i think to howard's point, the notion that no good deed goes unpunished. jan brewer is expanding the medical roles which i think is a very good move. there's very little that i think jan brewer does that's good. this is a good thing. low-inco
want a friend in washington, get a dog. president obama did so this week with the addition of sunny, another portuguese water dog, companion to bo and one of the few bright spots in the dog days of summer. joining me today, correspondent for "the guardian" anna marie cox and former director of speech writing for the president -- i can't get the words out, i'm so excited, columnist for the daily beast and co-founder of fenway strategies, jon favreau and "washington post" columnist and msnbc political columnist eugene robinson. joining us now is chuck todd who is also, of course, host of msnbc's "the daily rundown." before we get into the actual policy here, i want to talk about the sort of bird's-eye view as far as what the president is doing on this great middle class tour if you will. to me it seems like he's trying to build up as much political capital as possible before he gets back to washington. what do you think he's trying to do? >> i think he's trying to talk about what people around kitchen tables are talking about, right? this has been the great disconnect of washington, s
is speak the truth. secondly, there is a new generation of leaders stepping forward in washington. new, young at leaders, people like rand paul and marco rubio and mike lee and kelly ayotte. [applause] you know what is incredible? five years ago, not one of them was in office. you have to go back to after world war ii to see an instance where the generation of leaders who were effectively defending free-market principles is a new generation stepping forward -- let me suggest something. if you look at that new generation, they are almost always exactly the same age. was 10 whence, i ronald reagan became president. i was 18 when ronald reagan left the white house. know how for the world war ii generation, many of them would prefer to fdr as "our president?" i will go to my grave with ronald reagan defining what it means to be present. -- president. [applause] he didn't blink. i have referred to this next generation, this new generation as the children of reagan. listen to them communicate. listen to kelly stand up and talk about free-market principles. listen to marco. listen to rent. --
're always adding burdens, who is we, washington, when they don't let a camera around. there is so much money here, life is good >> john: we start with myth number 7 because americans are so fat it's government's job to help us eat better. >> changing old habits is never easy. >> john: no, it's not. so the first lady says to change behavior. >> it's going to take government doing its part. >> john: if michelle obama wants to inspire us by exercising on the white house lawn, that is great but with government it's force. >> this is not banning what you are buying but simply the size of the cup that can be used. >> john: i my hometown, they are upset about big cups of soda. they want big cups illegal. >> this is biggest thing to curb obesity. >> john: i can buy two of these, that is 32 ounces around i can buy one of these. ho does this curb obesity? >> my mayor is proud he has forced every chain restaurant to clearly post calorie koonth. >> there were few skeptics but now they are national models. >> john: that sadly that true. under obamacare all big chains will have to post calorie counts even
, who is we, washington, when they don't let a camera around. there is so much money here, life is good >> john: we start with myth number 7 because americans are so fat it's government's job to help us eat better. >> changing old habits is never easy. >> john: no, it's not. so the first lady says to change behavior. >> it's going to take government doing its part. >> john: if michelle obama wants to inspire us by exercising on the white house lawn, that is great but with government it's force. >> this is not banning what you are buying but simply the size of the cup that can be used. >> john: in my hometown, they are upset about big cups of soda. they want big cups illegal. >> this is biggest thing to curb esity. >> john: i can buy two of these, that is 32 ounces around i can buy one of these. how does this curb obesity? >> my mayor is proud he has forced every chain restaurant to clearly post calorie koonth. >> there were few skeptics but now they are national models. >> john: that sadly that true. under obamacare all big chains will have to post calorie counts even though they don't
canceled his meeting with russian president vladimir putin. that is all next on "washington journal." ♪ is sunday,orning, it august 11 come up 20 13. it is today, resident obama began his week long vacation at martha's vineyard. today we will be discussing the state of u.s. relations with dive intoking a deep u.s. job numbers, and talking about recent al qaeda threats. before we do that we want to hear about the state of news media from our viewers. the pew research center's -- you research center released its biannual data and while there is still plenty of criticism about the industry, most americans continue to believe the media plays an important watchdog role. as we take you through that reports this morning, we want to hear your thoughts. he of us a call. we split our lineup -- we split our lines up by age group. you can also catch up with us on all of your favorite social media sites, on twitter and facebook. you can also e-mail us at .ww.c-span.org we want to take you to that report that was released on thursday by the pew research center for the people. public valuations
. grew up in washington, d c -- d.c. she knew dolley madison when she was a little girl. they went to st. john's church on lafayette square. when she was 5-10 years old, she knew dolly madison. her father was a very famous naval commandants who took a ship on a commercial ship that went down. it was an act of bravery because he made sure that all the passengers on board got off a first. his widow and his daughter, their only child, then living in new york city were given all sorts of awards, a monument to him at annapolis naval academy. alan arthur is really interesting. she does not become first lady, but she influences the administration. very similar to racial jackson jacksonl the way that she was the ghost, the memory of her. chester arthur made several appointments, four we know of, specifically of people who had known his wife. one was a cousin in the office of the attorney general made assistant attorney general. another was in the treasury. it was very controversial that he named the superintendent of the naval academy, he appointed a friend of theirs, a childhood friend of his w
. let's play "hardball." good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. ask yourself, would abraham lincoln be a republican in 2013? would the man sitting up in that chair yesterday be invited to join the party of the birth errs, nullifiers and talkers of succession? just ask yourself in a lineup of ted cruz, rick perry and michele bachmann, and the great emancipator, who would be the odd man out? the reason the republican party wasn't represented yesterday at the king reunion at the lincoln memorial is that the republican party no more longer represents abraham lincoln. its real leader today would be jefferson davis or george wallace or strom thurmond, or some other character in the long list of null fires and obstructionists and states righters. can you imagine the reaction of tom paul had he been alive at the time of the emancipation proclamation? please don't ask. can you imagine to rick perry's claim that texas has the right to succeed from the unionany time it phil feels like it. the values of abraham lincoln, the belief in a strong federal government, the paramount right of h
of third rails. it's why you can't urinate anywhere in the washington d.c. area without getting electrocuted. that's true. that's a fact. the problem is that every single part of the tax code is in there because someone wanted it to be. if you as a politician even considered taking one out, its backers will make you pay. so you've got to think twice before going up against big hedge funds, big oil or big chicken poop. they'll get you. and what's more it's probably not just their current jobs that lawmakers are trying to protect. it's also their much more lucrative future jobs. >> in 1974, only 3% of retiring members of congress became lobbyists. today that number is 42% from members of the house and 50% for senators. >> john: i never thought i would say this: but washington really had so much more integrity back in the watergate era. ( applause ) look, all i'm saying is nowadays our lawmakers are so chicken [bleep] you could get a tax break for setting them on fire. that's not the point. here's the crazy thing. they're not wrong to be scared. which is why the credit must go here
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 365 (some duplicates have been removed)